Elizabeth Asbury

Elizabeth Asbury received her Ph.D from Imperial College London in 2005 and has published widely in the field of psychological morbidity, wellbeing and quality of life. She has an established track record of designing and running longitudinal intervention studies to improve psychological and physical wellbeing. Dr Asbury was an Occupational Psychologist before moving into health research, and was a Chartered Psychologist in the United Kingdom before relocating to New Zealand. She has been working with the Bachelor Health Science (Paramedicine) team at Whitireia New Zealand for three years, with a number of paramedicine specific publications currently under review.

Academic qualifications

2005 PhD Psychology Allied to Medicine Imperial College, University of London

1996 MSc Occupational Psychology Goldsmiths’ College, University of London

1995 BSc Psychology (Hons) 2(1) Goldsmiths’ College, University of London

Professional positions held

Aug 2016 to present Academic Project Leader Whitireia New Zealand

2014 to Aug 2016 Research Manager Whitireia New Zealand

2013 to Nov 2016 Contract Research Management Massey University

2011 to 2012 Contract Research Assessor Royal Society (RSNZ)

2009 to 2012 Consultant Psychologist Imperial College London

2005 to 2008 Honorary Psychologist Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust

1999 to 2008 Research Officer Imperial College London

1997 to 1999 Clinical Research Fellow University College London

1996 to 1997 Research Assistant Defence Evaluation Research Agency

Present research/professional speciality

Psychological wellbeing, social support and quality of life.

Paramedic mental wellbeing and job satisfaction, paramedic student resilience training.

Longitudinal and 45 interventional research. Psychology of occupational burnout. Minority methods of processing.

Professional distinctions and memberships

2017 Contestable Funding, W&W Research and Innovation Fund

2016 to present Chair, Whitireia WelTec Postgraduate Board of Studies 2016 International Network of Research Management Societies Conference, Best Poster (second place) 2016 2015 Travel Award, Australasian Research Management Society

2014 to present Member, Whitireia WelTec Postgraduate Board of Studies

2014 to present Member, Whitireia WelTec Ethics and Research Committee

2014 to 2017 Member, Australasian Research Management Society 2008 Project Grant (PG/06/087), The British Heart Foundation

2007 to 2010 Chartered Psychologist, British Psychological Society

2006 Best PhD Prize, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London

Peer-reviewed journal articles

Asbury EA, Webb C, Probert H, Wright C, Barbir M, Fox K, Collins P. (2012) Cardiac Rehabilitation to Improve Physical Functioning in Refractory Angina: A Pilot Study.

Cardiology.123(2):80 Asbury EA, Webb CM, Collins P. (2011) Group Support to Improve Psychosocial Wellbeing and Primary Care Demands among Women with Cardiac Syndrome X. Climacteric; 14(1):100-104.

Asbury EA, Kanji N, Ernst E, Barbir M, Collins P. (2009) Autogenic training to manage symptomology in women with chest pain and normal coronary arteries. Menopause; 16(1):60-65.

Asbury EA, Slattery C, Grant A, Evans L, Barbir M, Collins P. (2008) Cardiac rehabilitation for the treatment of women with chest pain and normal coronary arteries. Menopause; 15(3):454-460.

Asbury EA, Chandrruangphen P, Collins P. (2006) The importance of continued exercise participation in quality of life and psychological well-being in previously inactive postmenopausal women: a pilot study. Menopause; 13(4):561-567.

Asbury EA, Collins P. (2005) Psychosocial Factors Associated with Noncardiac Chest Pain and Cardiac Syndrome X. Herz; 30(1):55-60.

Asbury EA, Creed F, Collins P. (2004) Distinct psychological differences between women with coronary heart disease and cardiac syndrome x. Eur Heart J; 25(19):1695-1701.

Refereed conference proceedings

Asbury EA, Thompson S, Wills H, MacIver K, Wilson A, Thirkell C, Mitchell G. IPAWS: International Paramedic Anxiety Wellbeing and Stress Study. EMS World Expo. Las Vegas, USA, 2017

Asbury EA, Webb C, Probert H, Wright C, Barbir M, Fox K, Collins P. Cardiac Rehabilitation to Improve Physical Functioning in Refractory Angina. American Heart Association Conference, Orlando, 2011

Asbury EA, Kanji N, Ernst E, Barbir M, Collins P. Autogenic Training to Manage Chest pain in Women with Angina and Normal Coronary Arteries. American Heart Association Conference, Orlando, 2007.

Asbury EA, Slattery C, Grant A, Barbir M, Collins P. Cardiac Rehabilitation as a Treatment for Psychological Morbidity, Symptom Severity and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Women with Cardiac Syndrome X. American Heart Association Conference, New Orleans. Circ, 110 (17, supplement III, pp830), 2004

Asbury EA, Creed F, Collins P. Distinct Psychosocial Differences between Women with Coronary Heart Disease and Cardiac Syndrome X. 2003 May 9; British Psychological Society, Division of Health Psychology Annual Conference, 2003.

Asbury EA, Creed F, and Collins P. The Psychological Morbidity of Cardiac Syndrome X. World Congress on Cardiology, Sydney. JACC, 39 (9, supplement B), 2002.

 

Research title: Cardiac Rehabilitation to Improve Physical Functioning in Refractory Angina Principal outcome: Identified that cardiac rehabilitation was physically and psychologically advantageous for patients with refractory angina Principal end-user and contact: Cardiologist, physiotherapist, General practitioners, patients with refectory angina and their family members.

Research title: Cardiac Rehabilitation as a Treatment for Psychological Morbidity, Symptom Severity and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Women with Cardiac Syndrome X Principal outcome: Identified that cardiac rehabilitation was physically and psychologically advantageous for patients with cardiac syndrome x.

Principal end-user and contact: Cardiologists, physiotherapists, General practitioners, patients with cardiac syndrome x and their family members.

Research title: Distinct Psychosocial Differences between Women with Coronary Heart Disease and Cardiac Syndrome X Principal outcome: Identified that patients with cardiac syndrome x had higher psychological morbidity and poorer quality of life that coronary heart disease patients with a similar pain profile but decreased life expectancy.

Principal end-user and contact: Cardiologists, General practitioners, patients with cardiac syndrome x and their family members.

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